Why Doctors Choose to Die Differently

This CNN article reviews the consequences of the “do everything you can” medical directive for someone who is unable to make decisions for themselves.

Key ideas from the article:

“We can sustain a pumping heart and fill lungs with air indefinitely. Kidney function can now be replaced by humming dialysis carts and stomachs fed through surgically implanted tubes. In the intensive care unit, this process is carried on with extreme monotony, indifferent to whether the patient is actually able to think, feel, or protest. There comes a time for every person when his or her identity is gone, and the quality of life should be valued more than the mere presence of it.”

“Studies show there is a dichotomy between how health care workers view end-of-life care and how the rest of the world does. To illustrate this, a recent report published in the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA) describes data that was obtained from death records from Massachusetts, Michigan, Utah and Vermont from 2004 to 2011.

“It revealed that compared with the general population, doctors were less likely to die in a hospital, less likely to undergo surgery at the end of their lives, and less likely to be admitted to an intensive care unit. Similarly, a study published in Plos One by doctors at Stanford University in 2014 found 88.3% of 1,081 physicians surveyed for the study designated “do not resuscitate” as their advanced directive.”

“It is a painful truth that doctors are often asked to continue the kind of intensive measures they would never wish for themselves or a loved one. For those in the health care community, death is not an abstraction, but a daily reality. We know how precious life is, and we understand how difficult it is to watch family members lose people they love. But we also know in modern medicine, dying with dignity is a luxury more people should enjoy.”